Original red brick Victoria School House with illuminated glass facade addition on left taken at dusk from road with lit lamp posts on sidewalk

Goodes Hall, Smith School of Business, Queen's University

+VG was retained to design a major renovation and significant addition to the historically significant Victoria School, a Richardsonian Romanesque schoolhouse constructed in the late 1800’s.

The program was for adaptive re-use and an extensive addition to house the Smith School of Business – an innovative education facility for the 21st Century. +VG was commissioned to undertake the work as Prime Consultant. Phase I of the project integrated the 4,000 m2 Victoria School and a 6,500 m2 addition as the new consolidated home for the School.

The project introduced a new skylit atrium along the east side of the heritage building allowing the building’s east façade to be exposed within the new public space of the facility. Completely new mechanical systems were introduced and included the use of spare heating/cooling capacity from an adjacent campus building to serve the building’s needs. The new facility included seven tiered lecture halls, and two classrooms, student break-out rooms, PhD and MSC program space, faculty offices, a computer lab, a video conference facility, and administrative space. The project was successfully completed on time and on budget, and won three awards of excellence.

Phase II was completed in September 2014, which includes a west addition that creates a large forecourt at the interface of the University and the school itself. A glazed interior gathering public space, “the Commons”, overlooks the forecourt. The intent is to engage the school with the larger university constituency. Phase II also included two tiered 80 seat lecture rooms, a flexible classroom for 80 that can open up to the Commons for special events, additional program spaces, faculty offices, and underground parking for 90 cars. Although Phase II was designed to achieve LEED Silver certification, the project was awarded LEED NC Gold certification.

LOCATION

Kingston, Ontario

CLIENT

Queen’s University

COMPLETED

2014 (Phase II); 2002 (Phase I)

SIZE

100,000 ft² (PII); 110,000 ft² (PI)

LEED

LEED® Gold Certified

SERVICES

Renovation & Addition

PHOTOGRAPHY

David Whittaker

AWARDS

2008 Liveable City Award
City of Kingston

2003 Architectural Excellence Award (Honourable Mention)
Ontario Association of Architects (OAA)

2002 Award of Excellence
Frontenac County Heritage Foundation

 

 


Night view of illuminated double height front entrance with roof canopy connecting original stone façade with new addition

St. Michael Catholic Elementary School

In 2007, St. Michael CES had a student enrolment of approximately 400 FTE students.

The original building, built in 1908 and 1913, had been added to again in the 1950’s and 1970’s to accommodate, at its pinnacle, a total student enrolment of 650. +VG Architects led a school Planning Accommodation Review Committee process with the Board and School Community to help clarify academic needs and facilitate the transition to a new facility right-sized for their current and projected enrolments. Key in this process was sincere listening to the concerns of the school community while reinforcing the opportunities available to augment academic and community program spaces not achievable within the existing facility.

The process resulted in the unanimous approval of the final design approach that would see the implementation of full day kindergarten, enhanced facilities for physical education and computer literacy, classroom technology improvements, and improved non-core program elements such as larger rejuvenated play yards and space for “Before and After” childcare facilities.

The re-construction of St. Michael’s School occurred within an occupied facility on a tight urban site.

LOCATION

Belleville, Ontario

CLIENT

Algonquin & Lakeshore Catholic District School Board (ALCDSB)

COMPLETED

2012

SIZE

39,000 ft²

CAPACITY

400 FTS

SERVICES

Reconstruction

PHOTOGRAPHY

Peter Chatterton


Children's classroom with long wooden tables and chairs, bookshelves, storage cupboards and large bright windows

Wortley YMCA Child Care Centre, London Normal School

The London Normal School is a Provincially significant heritage property designated under the Ontario Heritage Act.

This project created a state-of-the-art YMCA child care facility, learning spaces, camp programs and administration space within the historic facility.

+VG was the Prime Consultant responsible for planning, design, contract documents, tendering support, contract administration, general review, commissioning, and close-out.

LOCATION

London, Ontario

CLIENT

City of London

COMPLETED

2017

SIZE

20 Infant, 40 Toddler, 44 Pre-school

SERVICES

Renovation

PHOTOGRAPHY

Mario Madau

AWARDS

2012 Green Brick Award
Urban League of London


Illuminated double height glazed addition with Pumphouse lettering on glass with trees and sunrise in background

Kingston Pump House Steam Museum

The Kingston Pump House Museum is a demonstration of the original waterworks that served the City of Kingston in the 19th Century.

The Pump House is located in one of Canada’s oldest original water works – where steam-powered pumps provided the first running water to Kingston residents from 1851. Only six similar preserved water pumping stations remain in North America

The assignment involved an addition to house workshops, arrival and orientation space for school groups, new accessible washrooms and office areas, as well as renovations to the existing historic building.

LOCATION

Kingston, Ontario

CLIENT

City of Kingston

COMPLETED

2017

SIZE

9,200 ft²

SERVICES

Renovation & Addition

PHOTOGRAPHY

David Bell


Glazed visitor centre with overhanging wood rafter ceiling and outdoor patio with fort in background

Fort Henry Discovery Centre

Located in Kingston, and part of the St. Lawrence River tourist corridor, Fort Henry provides a living example of garrison life within the period before and after Confederation.

In 2007, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) classified the Rideau Canal and all area fortifications and surrounding land- scapes as a World Heritage Site. To augment the new World Heritage classification, a new Visitors Interpretive Centre was proposed to further develop the attraction for an immersive tourist experience. New programs have been designed to increase revenues for the site, and to prepare for an increase in attendance by the local community and tourists.

Careful consideration was taken to design this attraction on a historic site at the entrance to the Rideau Canal system.

The project included a new multi-purpose space and event venue, outdoor patios, an 1,850 ft² gift shop for museum souvenirs, a 800 ft² snackbar, and public wash- rooms.

LOCATION

Kingston, Ontario

CLIENT

St. Lawrence Parks Commission

DESIGNATED

UNESCO World Heritage Site

COMPLETED

December 2012

SIZE

10,000 ft²

SERVICES

New Construction on a UNESCO World Heritage Site

PHOTOGRAPHY

Peter Chatterton

AWARDS

2014 CAHP Awards
New Building on a Historic Site


Stone walled garden and glazed entrance with wood cantilever roof, and clerestory windows of addition and stormy skies in background

Lennox & Addington Museum & Archives

The County Museum and Archives is adjacent to the County’s stately limestone Courthouse, restored by +VG Architects in 1996. The museum, an 1864 limestone building, was, until 1971, the county jail.

In 2002, the County retained +VG Architects to provide architectural consulting and museum planning services to carry out a review of the Museum and Archives structural and functional components, such as service delivery and accessibility, in order to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the Museum operation for the 21st Century. One of the major goals of the study was to find ways to accommodate more flexible space for student activity, education programs, and multi-purpose needs.

In Spring 2009, +VG was asked to revisit the study to review the program against current needs and update project costing in anticipation of proceeding with implementation of the Museum and Archives Master Plan vision later in 2009. In 2011, +VG was retained to design the expansion to the existing Archives building. We were chosen for the expertise and experience with designing institutional buildings within historical contexts.

The expansion includes new activity and educational program areas, public washrooms, relocated Research Room and Archival Storage, multi-purpose space, storage space in the basement, and a new one-storey gallery addition.

The historical setting of the property as a whole, represented a unique challenge. In order to fully appreciate this setting, it was imperative that the development of the property be designed in harmony with both the topography of the site and the existing heritage fabric, so that the historical beauty of the existing building and natural open area of the site will continue to be the dominant features. To accomplish this, careful consideration has been given to the size and siting of the building, the architecture of the new intervention in regards to the choice of cladding materials, and in maintaining as much as possible of the property in its natural current state.

LOCATION

Napanee, Ontario

CLIENT

County of Lennox & Addington

COMPLETED

2014

SIZE

12,000 ft²

SERVICES

Study, Renovation & Addition

PHOTOGRAPHY

David Bell


View of illuminated front entrance and building from open courtyard at night

Hamilton City Hall

Hamilton City Hall was designed in the modernist International Style by Canada’s first municipally-employed architect, Stanley M. Roscoe.

Constructed in 1960, it has become one of the few intact examples of this style of architecture in Canada, and exemplifies a progressive movement away from the Victorian historicism of Hamilton at the time. Attributes of the International Style found in the design include: massing and geometry, open interior plan, structural grid system and the use of curtain wall, flat roofs, finishing materials of steel, concrete and marble, and the integration of art (as opposed to ornamentation) into the design.

The 2010 heritage rehabilitation of this modernist International Style building included:

  • Relocation of services to the main floor to provide greater ease of access for the public
  • Improvements to the building’s energy performance by insulating exterior walls, and installation of high efficiency mechanical systems
  • Upgrades to meet current OBC requirements including barrier free accessibility
  • Replacement of major building services and integration of contemporary technology

Challenges of the Heritage Conservation Plan:

  • Integration of new building systems while respecting the heritage building fabric
  • Replacement of exterior marble cladding with more durable cladding due to life safety and structural stability concerns caused by deterioration of the original marble in the southern Ontario climate
  • Protection and restoration of Italian glass mosaic tile used extensively on exterior soffits, spandrel panels, and fascia, and interior walls and ceilings
  • Protection and restoration of terrazzo flooring, interior wood paneling and doors, luminescent stone panels, marble interior paneling, aluminum handrails and guards, and curtain wall
  • Conservation of interior art murals including cleaning, protection and relocation of one mural
  • Rehabilitation of the Council Chambers with dome skylight

LOCATION

Hamilton, Ontario

CLIENT

City of Hamilton

DESIGNATED

Ontario Heritage Act, Part IV

COMPLETED

2010

SIZE

180,000 ft²

SERVICES

Heritage Consulting Services for Rehabilitation

AWARDS

2012 Toby Award (Office Building of the Year Award, Corporate Facility)
Building Owners & Managers Association (BOMA Toronto)

2011 Award of Merit (Restoration)
City of Hamilton Public Works Department


Hamilton POA Courthouse

+VG Architects served as the Prime Consultant, in association with Invizij Architects, to deliver all consulting services required for the design and construction of this renovation and energy modernization project which was performed through a Construction Management model.

The project includes the integration of a heating and cooling retrofit through the Hamilton Utility Corporation (“HUC”) designed independently by H.H. Angus and Associates Consulting Engineers. The design conforms to the City’s Barrier Free Design Guidelines.

The Art Deco building was previously occupied by McMaster University as a tenant. The project intent was to convert the heritage building to provide a functional space for the Provincial Offences Administration (POA) offices, as well as all necessary courtrooms and ancillary spaces for both staff and the public, and additional administrative offices for the Ontario Municipal Board and City of Hamilton staff, and to accommodate future growth.

Work to protect and preserve the historic elements of the building was guided by City of Hamilton Heritage Resource Management. The majority of the work focused on the interior renovation of the facility, but some exterior work was required to comply with accessibility and police vehicular turning radius requirements.

LOCATION

Hamilton, Ontario

CLIENT

City of Hamilton

COMPLETED

2017

SIZE

112,000 ft²

SERVICES

Renovation & Energy Modernization

PHOTOGRAPHY

Tom Ridout